Anton Chekhov

A picture of the author Anton Chekhov

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (Jan 29, 1860 - Jul 15, 1904) was a Russian physician and supreme short story writer and playwright. He was the third of six children. His father was a grocer, painter and religious fanatic with a mercurial temperament who "thrashed" his children and was likely emotionally abusive to his wife. Chekhov, like Dickens, was no stranger to financial hardship and in 1875 his father took the family and fled to Moscow to escape creditors. Chekhov stayed behind for three more years to finish school. He paid for his tuition by catching and selling goldfinches and dispensing private tutoring lessons, and selling short sketches to the newspaper. He sent any money he could spare money to his family in Moscow. A child-family separation theme plays out in several of Chekhov stories including Vanka, The Steppe, and Sleepy.

In 1879 Chekhov was admitted to medical school and he joined his family in Moscow. He assumed financial responsibility for the family and while attending classes at Moscow State University he wrote and sold a large number of humorous stories and vignettes of contemporary Russian life. He published more than 400 short stories, sketches and vignettes by the age of twenty-six.

Some consider Chekhov to be the founder of the modern short story and his influence is observed in a diverse group of writers including Flannery O'Connor, Tennessee Williams, Somerset Maugham, Raymond Carver and John Cheever. Most of the English-speaking world knows him as a playwright, particularly for The Seagull, Uncle Vanya, Three Sisters and The Cherry Orchard.

Painting of Anton Chekhov by Valentine SerovSome popular starting points for short story readers include, Ward No. 6, The Darling and Gusev, The Hunstman and The Lady with the Little Dog. A Dreary Story is also an excellent work. Due to it's length I have classified it here as a book. It's also well known under the alternative title A Boring Story which is the title listed in the short story section as a convenience to readers searching under that name. Anton Chekhov himself was personally fond of his short story The Student.

In 1897 Chekhov was diagnosed with tuberculosis. He purchased land in Yalta in 1898 after his father's death and had a villa built. He moved into the villa in 1899 with his mother and sister. This was a very prolific period for the great writer and he produced some of his most famous work during this period. Amongst those works is a trilogoy featuring Ivan Ivanovitch, a veterinary surgeon and his schoolmaster friend, Burkin. The two are on a small trekking and shooting holiday. Chekhov overlays three stories that are amongst his most famous short stories in a trilogy sometimes referred to as "The Little Trilogy". The three short stories, in order, are: The Man in a Case, Gooseberries, and About Love. It was also during this period in Yalta that he produced Three Sisters and The Cherry Orchard.

Witty to the end, Chekhov's last words were, "I haven't had champagne for a long time." His words were a play on a specific etiquette practiced in German medicine at the time; when it was determined that there was no hope for a patient's recovery, it was customary for the doctor to offer the patient a glass of champagne.

Anton Chekhov has two volumes of great short stories featured in the Short Story Collections here at American Literature.

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A Dreary Story
The Wife


A Tragedian in Spite of Himself
On The High Road
The Anniversary
The Bear
The Cherry Orchard
The Proposal
The Sea-Gull
The Three Sisters
The Wedding
Uncle Vanya

Short Stories

A Bad Business
A Blunder
A Boring Story
About Love
A Chameleon
A Classical Student
A Country Cottage
A Daughter Of Albion
A Day In The Country
A Dead Body
A Defenseless Creature
A Doctor's Visit
A Father
After The Theatre
A Gentleman Friend
A Happy Ending
A Happy Man
A Joke
A Lady's Story
A Living Chattle
A Malefactor
A Misfortune
A Mystery
An Actor's End
An Adventure
An Anonymous Story
An Artist's Story
An Avenger
An Enigmatic Nature
A Nervous Breakdown
A Nightmare
An Inadvertence
An Incident
An Inquiry
Anna On The Neck
An Upheaval
A Peculiar Man
A Pink Stocking
A Play
A Problem
A Slander
A Story Without An End
A Story Without A Title
At A Country House
At A Summer Villa
At Christmas Time
At Home
A Tragic Actor
A Transgression
A Trifle From Life
A Tripping Tongue
A Trivial Incident
A Troublesome Visitor
At The Barber's
A Woman's Kingdom
A Work Of Art
Bad Weather
Difficult People
Easter Eve
Excellent People
Expensive Lessons
Fat And Thin
From The Diary Of A Violent-tempered Man
Gone Astray
In A Hotel
In A Strange Land
In Exile
In Passion Week
In The Coach-house
In The Court
In The Dark
In The Graveyard
In The Ravine
In Trouble
Ivan Matveyich
Mari D'elle
Minds In Ferment
My Life
Not Wanted
Oh! The Public!
Old Age
On Official Duty
On The Road
Overdoing It
Panic Fears
Peasant Wives
Rothschild's Fiddle
Shrove Tuesday
Small Fry
Strong Impressions
The Album
The Beauties
The Beggar
The Bet
The Bird Market
The Bishop
The Black Monk
The Boys
The Cattle-dealers
The Chemist's Wife
The Chorus Girl
The Cook's Wedding
The Cossack
The Darling
The Death Of A Government Clerk
The Dependents
The Doctor
The Duel
The Examining Magistrate
The First-class Passenger
The Fish
The Grasshopper
The Head-gardener's Story
The Head Of The Family
The Helpmate
The Horse Stealers
The House with the Mezzanine
The Huntsman
The Husband
The Juene Premier
The Kiss
The Lady With The Little Dog
The Letter
The Lion And The Sun
The Looking Glass
The Lottery Ticket
The Man In A Case
The Marshal's Widow
The Murder
The New Villa
The Old House
The Orator
The Party
The Petchenyeg
The Pipe
The Post
The Princess
The Privy Councillor
The Requiem
The Runaway
The Safety Match
The Schoolmaster
The Schoolmistress
The Shoemaker And The Devil
The Slanderer
The Steppe
The Student
The Swedish Match
The Teacher Of Literature
The Trousseau
The Two Volodyas
The Wife
The Witch
Three Years
Too Early!
Ward No. 6
Who Was To Blame?