Mother Earth's Children

by


Mother Earth's Children: The Frolics of the Fruits and Vegetables (1914) is a collection of poems for young children to appreciate the joy of fresh food! See if you can make a game of finding and naming them next time you are at the farmer's market or grocery store.
An illustration for the story Mother Earth's Children by the author Elizabeth Gordon
An illustration for the story Mother Earth's Children by the author Elizabeth Gordon
An illustration for the story Mother Earth's Children by the author Elizabeth Gordon

Mother Earth's Children, radish LITTLE Miss Radish, pretty thing,
Has her birthday in the spring;
She and the little Onions play
Out in the garden all the day.

Mother Earth's Children, rhubarb WHEN Orchard Oriole sings his song
The Rhubarb children troop along;
They’re hardy, healthy youngsters, too,
And stay the whole, long summer through.

Mother Earth's Children, lettuce-dandelion SAID Lettuce, tender-hearted lass:
“Come Dandelion, ’neath my glass;”
But Dandelion smiled and said
She liked the nice fresh air instead.

Mother Earth's Children, spanish onion "SAID Spanish Onion: “I don’t see
Why people weep at sight of me;
I’m a nice, friendly sort of chappie
And like to make everybody happy.”

Mother Earth's Children, button mushroom THE Button Mushrooms went to play
With the small Puff Balls one bright day;
They had such heaps of glorious fun,
But all ran home at set of sun.

Mother Earth's Children, asparagus ASPARAGUS in early spring
Came up to hear the robins sing;
When she peeped out her dress was white;
It turned green in the sunshine bright.

Mother Earth's Children, green peas THE Green Pea children went to sail
On the Sauce Pan ocean in a gale;
“This boat’s a shell,” they cried; “Dear me!
We might capsize in this deep sea.”

Mother Earth's Children, spinach SAID Spinach: “In my dress of green
I’m just as happy as a queen.
I’m truly glad that I am good
For little babies’ early food.”

Mother Earth's Children, strawberry LITTLE Wild Strawberry came down
To visit with her folks in town;
She’s a sweet child with charming ways
And blushes modestly at praise.

Mother Earth's Children, endive SAID Endive: “I was born in France
But travel when I get a chance.”
Said Celery: “I travel, too,
But my real home’s in Kalamazoo.”

Mother Earth's Children, carrots THE Carrot ladies love to go
To church on Sundays in a row;
And, tall or short, each lady fair
Wears a green feather in her hair.

Mother Earth's Children, pearl onion PEARL Onion, tiny little thing,
Lives out doors from early spring;
She’s German, so I understand,
And dearly loves her father-land.

Mother Earth's Children, cherries “CHERRIES are ripe,” said Old Blue Jay
As he flew by one August day;
“Why, he means us,” the Cherries cried,
“Perhaps we’d better go inside.”

Mother Earth's Children, string beans THE String Beans love to climb a pole,
And so their clothes are seldom whole.
Mother Bean said: “I’ll mend the tatters;
While they are happy, nothing matters!”

Mother Earth's Children, potato SAID Dame Potato: “Hurry, Pat!
And wash your face and feed the cat,
Then run to school, or you’ll be late;
Just see! It’s nearly half past eight!”

Mother Earth's Children, raspberry “GOOD morning, friends! Know who I am?
I’m Raspberry who makes the jam;
You know—that on the pantry shelf—
I make that every year myself.”

Mother Earth's Children, red pepper RED Pepper said a biting word
Which Miss Green Pepper overheard;
Said she: “Hot words you can’t recall;
Better not say such things at all.”

Mother Earth's Children,cucumber SAID Miss Cucumber: “I have brought
My fan, because the day is hot;
Our family have a splendid rule,—
Whatever happens, we keep cool.”

Mother Earth's Children, gumbo with okra GUMBO’S a splendid southern cook,
And, without looking in the book,
He’ll make a savory soup or stew,
And send it, steaming hot, to you.

Mother Earth's Children, blueberries THE Blueberry children love to run
Around the hillsides in the sun;
Smiling and jolly, plump and sweet,
Best-natured youngsters one could meet.

Mother Earth's Children, beet “EVERY one knows,” said Madame Beet
“My disposition’s very sweet;
And though to plumpness I am prone,
My color’s every bit my own.”

Mother Earth's Children, chicory “MY new spring dress,” said Chicory,
“Is just as lacy as can be;
Shading from green to purest white
Its ruffles are my heart’s delight!”

Mother Earth's Children, currant THE Currant ladies look so sweet
In their green dresses, cool and neat.
They offer you, for your delight,
Their strings of berries, red and white.

Mother Earth's Children, brussel sprouts SAID Brussels Sprout: “I am so glad
That I’m such a good-looking lad.”
Horseradish said: “I’m glad I’m plain
If good looks make a chap so vain.”

Mother Earth's Children, rutabaga turnip SAID Rutabaga Turnip: “Wow!
I just escaped that hungry cow;
I jumped behind a great big tree
Or she’d have surely eaten me!”

Mother Earth's Children, Musk-melon “DEAR me!” Madam Muskmelon said,
 “Those children will not stay in bed;
Before the darlings get misplaced
I’ll tie each baby to my waist.”

Mother Earth's Children, watermelon WATERMELON’S dress of green
Trimmed in rose pink you all have seen
She has such pleasant smiling ways,
We welcome her on summer days.

Mother Earth's Children, cauliflower SAID Cauliflower: “I used to be
A cabbage, so some folks tell me;
When I’ve improved some more—who knows?
Maybe I’ll be a Cabbage Rose.”

Mother Earth's Children, plums HAND in hand with summer comes
The happy family called the Plums,
Some dressed in purple, some in red;
They’re very pretty and well bred.

Mother Earth's Children, eggplant SAID pompous, purple Egg-plant: “Well!
So that is egg in that queer shell;
Really! It’s very hard to see
Why they named that chap after me!”

Mother Earth's Children, pear SAID Mother Pear: “Dear me! Those twins
Are just as much alike as pins;
I must do something, I declare!”
So she cut little sister’s hair.

Mother Earth's Children, banana BANANA wears a yellow coat
Buttoned quite snugly ’round his throat.
He comes from where it’s warm, you see,
And feels cold more than you or me.

Mother Earth's Children, apple HERE’S Apple, loved by young and old
And sometimes worth his weight in gold.
We hail him with delighted cries
When he comes to us, baked in pies.

Mother Earth's Children, gourd (squash) SAID Mr. Gourd: “You’ll plainly see
We are a busy family;
We give you bottles, cups and things,
And curly vines for playtime rings.”

Mother Earth's Children, grapes WILD Grape just loves to run away
And in the green woods climb and play;
You’ll know him when among the trees
His fragrant blossoms scent the breeze.

Mother Earth's Children, lemon THE Lemons every summer go
In groups to see the Wild West Show;
Come rain or shine, they never stay
At home on any circus day.

Mother Earth's Children, orange MISS Orange said: “I’d like to know
Those pretty mountain girls called ‘Snow;’”
“Don’t,” said her Dad, “or we are lost;
They’re relatives of Sir Jack Frost.”

Mother Earth's Children, cranberry CRANBERRY dearly loves to go
Wading in places wet and low;
She wears soft gowns of dainty floss
Made of the pretty yellow moss.

Mother Earth's Children, tomato NORTH Wind came whistling by one day
Where the Tomatoes were at play;
It gave those children such a fright
They put their blankets on that night.

Mother Earth's Children, pumpkin THE Pumpkin children, everyone,
On Hallowe’en go out for fun;
With Jack o’lantern and his crew
They find such jolly things to do.

Featured in our collection of Children's Poems. Children learning to read may also enjoy our collection, Pre-K Wordplay!


10

facebook share button twitter share button google plus share button tumblr share button reddit share button email share button share on pinterest pinterest


Create a library and add your favorite stories. Get started by clicking the "Add" button.
Add Mother Earth's Children to your own personal library.

Return to the Elizabeth Gordon Home Page

Or read more short stories for kids in our Children's Library

Anton Chekhov
Nathaniel Hawthorne
Susan Glaspell
Mark Twain
Edgar Allan Poe
Mary E. Wilkins Freeman
Herman Melville
Stephen Leacock
Kate Chopin
Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson