Monosyllabics

by


Monosyllabics is a delightful poem of short vowel rhymes (C-V-C words), perfect for toddlers! The hardest word to sound out is this poem's title! Published in Ms. Richards' collection for very young children, Three Minute Stories, illustrated by Josephine H. Bruce (1914).

Monosyllabics, cat sat in hat

The black cat sat In the fat man’s hat; “Oh, dear!” the fat man said. “May the great gray bat Catch the bad black cat Who has left me no hat For my head!” The big brown bear Tried to curl his hair To go to the Fair so gay. But he looked such a fright That his aunt took flight, And he cried till night, they say. A pale pink pig, In a large blond wig, Danced a wild, wild jig On the lea; But a rude old goat, In a sky-blue coat, Said, “You’re nought but a shoat, tee hee!” A poor old King Sold his gay gold ring For to buy his old wife some cream; But the cat lapped it up With a sip and a sup, And his tears ran down in a stream. A large red cow Tried to make a bow, But did not know how, They say. For her legs got mixed, And her horns got fixed, And her tail would get In her way. A boy named Sam Had a fat pet ram, And gave him some jam For his tea; But the fat pet ram Tried to butt poor Sam, Till he had to turn And flee. A girl named Jane Had a sad, bad pain In the place where she wore Her belt; She mopped and she mowed, And she screamed aloud, Just to show the crowd How she felt. A sad, thin ape Bought some wide white tape To trim a new cape For his niece; But a bold buff calf, With a loud, rude laugh, Bit off one whole half For his geese. A pert, proud hen Laid an egg, and then Said “Cluck!” and “cluck!” and “cluck!” Said the cock, “Had I known You would take that tone, I would have wooed none But a duck!”

If your child enjoyed this poem, you might also enjoy reading The Owl and the Pussy-Cat by Edward Lear. Explore more Pre-K Wordplay! and Poems for Children


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Return to the Laura E. Richards Home Page, or . . . Read the next poem; Mr. Hoppy Frog

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