Ozymandias

by


Percy Bysshe's poem, Ozymandias (1818) is a traveler's description of a ruined statue of the Egyptian King Ramses II from the 13th century BCE. Often studied by students in grades 9-10 in conjunction with world history.
An illustration for the story Ozymandias by the author Percy Bysshe Shelley An illustration for the story Ozymandias by the author Percy Bysshe Shelley An illustration for the story Ozymandias by the author Percy Bysshe Shelley
I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert…Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, 
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed: 
And on the pedestal these words appear:

'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!'
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

10

facebook share button twitter share button google plus share button tumblr share button reddit share button email share button share on pinterest pinterest


Create a library and add your favorite stories. Get started by clicking the "Add" button.
Add Ozymandias to your own personal library.

Return to the Percy Bysshe Shelley Home Page, or . . . Read the next poem; The Moon

Anton Chekhov
Nathaniel Hawthorne
Susan Glaspell
Mark Twain
Edgar Allan Poe
Mary E. Wilkins Freeman
Herman Melville
Stephen Leacock
Kate Chopin
Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson