A picture for the book Democracy in America

Democracy in America


In what has become a classic reference for studying political science, Alexis de Tocqueville's Democracy in America is about why republican representative democracy works in the United States and fails in so many other places, and how to apply this knowledge to the failing democracy in France. He had a unique perspective as a French diplomat and historian who spent years visiting and talking with people from every state in the United States and studying its governance. He argues that the social and economic conditions have become more equal during the last seven hundred years, resulting in widespread trade, commerce, and the move toward eliminating indentureship (though the 13th amendment freeing African-Americans was not ratified until 1865).

Tocqueville never took democracy for granted as inevitable. He discussed its possible threats and the risk of developing "a tyranny of the majority." Some contemporary pundits and government reform advocates would argue that threat remains quite real today. Democracy in America remains a vital piece of American history and literature. It continues to be studied in high school grades 9-10. It was published as two volumes, five years apart (1835 and 1840). We offer the first here. The edition we chose was translated by Henry Reeve. Third-party introductions and analyses have been eliminated so readers can draw their own conclusions from Tocqueville's words.


Introduction

Chapter I - Exterior Form of North America

Chapter II - Origin of the Anglo-Americans, Part I

Chapter II - Origin of the Anglo-Americans, Part II

Chapter III - Social Conditions of the Anglo-Americans

Chapter IV - The Principle Of The Sovereignty Of The People In America

Chapter V - Necessity Of Examining The Condition Of The States—Part I

Chapter V - Necessity Of Examining The Condition Of The States—Part II

Chapter V - Necessity of Examining The Condition of The States--Part III

Chapter VI - Judicial Power in the United States

Chapter VII - Political Jurisdiction in the United States

Chapter VIII - The Federal Constitution--Part I

Chapter VIII - The Federal Constitution--Part II

Chapter VIII - The Federal Constitution--Part III

Chapter VIII - The Federal Constitution--Part IV

Chapter VIII - The Federal Constitution--Part V

Chapter XI - Why the People May Strictly Be Said to Govern in the United

Chapter X - Parties of the United States

Chapter XI - Liberty of the Press in the United States

Chapter XII - Political Associations in the United States

Chapter XIII - Government of the Democracy in America--Part I

Chapter XIII - Government of the Democracy in America--Part II

Chapter XIII - Government of the Democracy in America--Part III

Chapter XIV - Advantages American Society Derive from Democracy--Part I

Chapter XIV - Advantages American Society Derive from Democracy--Part II

Chapter XV - Unlimited Power of Majority, and Its Consequences--Part I

Chapter XV - Unlimited Power of Majority, and Its Consequences--Part II

Chapter XVI - Causes Mitigating Tyranny in the United States--Part I

Chapter XVI - Causes Mitigating Tyranny in the Unites States--Part II

Chapter XVII - Principle Causes Maintaining the Democratic Republic--Part I

Chapter XVII - Principle Causes Maintaining the Democratic Republic--Part II

Chapter XVII - Principle Causes Maintaining the Democratic Republic--Part III

Chapter XVII - Principle Causes Maintaining the Democratic Republic--Part IV

Chapter XVIII - Future Condition of Three Races in the Unites States--Part I

Chapter XVIII - Future Condition of Three Races in the United States--Part II

Chapter XVIII - Future Condition of Three Races in the Unites States--Part III

Chapter XVIII - Future Condition of Three Races in the Unites States--Part IV

Chapter XVIII - Future Condition of Three Races in the United States--Part V

Chapter XVIII - Future Condition of Three Races in the United States--Part VI

Chapter XVIII - Future Condition of Three Races in the United States--Part VII

Chapter XVIII - Future Condition of Three Races in the United States--Part VIII

Chapter XVIII - Future Condition of Three Races in the United States--Part IX

Chapter XVIII - Future Condition of Three Races in the United States--Part X

Conclusion

Return to the Alexis de Tocqueville library.